Author Topic: King of the Hill  (Read 32287 times)

Spark Of Spirit

  • Forward & Up!
  • Da Mod Squad
  • Head Of City Security
  • ********
  • Posts: 16182
  • Keep Moving
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #30 on: February 09, 2011, 02:41:07 PM »
Season 5

Season 5 is a noticeably darker season than any other season. While some episodes aren't as straightforward in their dark atmosphere, they tend to feature characters pushed to their limits and at the end of their rope (though obviously not to Bill's extent in Pretty Pretty Dresses), and few episodes are as touching as they are inspiring in seeing the characters break through their issues. I used to consider this the second best season of the show, but re-watching season 4 got me to change my opinion. Season 5 is still one of the best shows of the series, but it's not for everyone. Nonetheless, it's still a top notch season.


85. The Perils Of Polling

This episode is a bit of a subtle shift in tone. Hank's whole world is put upside down because of the aspect of a poor handshake from someone who he believed had character. While this may seem silly in typical KOTH fashion, it also makes perfect sense. Hank is betrayed and doesn't know what to believe anymore and by the end of the episode is forced to make a decision in what he believes is the right thing. It's a bit of a patriotic episode, but goes a bit personal, as you really can learn a lot about someone from a handshake. Special points go towards the communist subplot, the scene where the manger babies try to recruit "Comrade Hill" is one of the best scenes in the entire show's run.


86. The Buck Stops Here

The episode where Hank finally understands what Buck Strickland is really all about. His faith in his boss was shaken before, but it is totally destroyed here. By the way, this episode gets surprisingly dark and seedy at times. I shudder to think what would have happened to Bobby had Hank not shown up when he did. Still, this is a great episode that would be totally out of place in any other season.


87. "That annoyingly long title named after Dawson Creek's theme"

We were being prepared for this episode ever since season 2. The kids were getting older, there was foreshadowing that they were nearing childhood's end, and this particular plot-line started off with Aisle 8A from the previous season. This episode starts at summer's end as Joseph comes back lanky and awkward from his summer camp, Bobby turns 13, and everything is different now. This episode is a mess (in a great way, however) in order to explore the convoluted feelings of becoming a teenager. The ending is also another perfect touch. Also, this episode restarts the Bobby-Connie-Joseph triangle from before only it's much differently executed from this point on.


88. Spin The Choice

John Redcorn has a really bad time in this episode. Unable to pass his teachings on to his uncaring (and still confused) biological son, he also has to deal with being pushed out of his life and denied the land his people lived on. This episode does a lot for John Redcorn as a character and features recurring theme of life-fulfillment he carries with him until he finds his place in the final season. Another great, but dark, episode. Peggy's game is also ridiculously stupid, but it is funny and helps pull off the tension of the main plot.


89. Peggy Makes The Big Leagues

More on the schools. This time Peggy has to teach a student no one else will because he's a great football player and don't want to mess with their winning streak. Thankfully David wises up and realizes that she is actually trying to help him do more with his life and pushes himself to be better at school. It's a nice break from the darker episodes of this season.


90. When Cotton Comes Marching Home

Cotton is absolutely hammered in this episode. Both because of his pride and because of the poor ways veterans are treated (even on Veteran's Day), it's an interesting episode to see Cotton so thoroughly confused and at wits end since he's usually so confident. I always get a kick out of Cotton's job being supervising others putting asbestos into schools and hospitals.


91. What Makes Bobby Run?

What indeed? Another great episode where Bobby has to confront his fear of, well, confrontations. I always enjoy episodes where Bobby is put forth to test himself, and this is no exception. You have to give him credit for his plan to get Mr. Crackers at the end. That took guts.


92. Twas The Nut Before Christmas

This episode annoys me to no end. Bill does something good for kids, messes it up (in the creepiest way possible), gets hooked in with a scheming slacker, and does a 180 personality wise at the end to turn on the idiot. Sorry, I just don't like this episode and can't stand watching it. The worst part is that this set up is used for other episodes in the future. Ugh.


93. Chasing Bobby

One of the best episodes of the series, it constantly looks into the many father/son dynamics in the show's relationships all coming down to Hank and his truck. It's a bit of a sad episode, but one that leaves you with hope at the end. Plus it's probably the only time in the whole series we see Hank shed a tear.


94. Yankee Hankee

Man, this episode is depressing. But unlike TTNBC, this episode makes up for it by being both funny and having a great message at the end. Plus, it has a lot of great lines. SUCKER-PUNCH.


95. Hank & The Great Glass Elevator

The first half of the episode is mainly straightforward KOTH with some good lines and plot, but what makes the episode truly memorable is us finally meeting the woman who destroyed Bill's life, his ex-wife Lenore. And not only that, we seem him finally put her behind him (literally!) as he is finally able to move on with his life. (If I'm not mistaken he never even mentions her again after this point except for a reference point of some kind) This is a deceptively important episode in the series.


96. Now Who's The Dummy?

He was disturbed before you got here! We meet Dale's childhood trauma as Bobby learns to be a ventriloquist. This is a really funny episode, and a nice break from the heavier stuff we were dealing with in the series around then.


97. Ho Yeah!

A+. 10/10. Two Thumbs Up. 100%. One of the absolute funniest episodes in the entire series. This is a completely comedy based episode that would slide right in with any season, but it still works wonders here. ALABASTER!


98. The Exterminator

Back to the depressing. This episode focuses on Dale and gives him a new job where he is forced to remove everything about him that gives him an identity and is thrown into the office world and torn apart until he brings out his ugly side in order to survive. I have to be honest, this is a hard episode to watch. If it wasn't for the funny lines and the ending... I'm not sure if I would like it as much, but as a whole it is a top notch episode. It's just hard to watch sometimes.


99. Luanne Virgin 2.0

Thankfully this episode isn't as hard on Luanne (she had a hard enough time in season 3) but is actually more about Hank and Peggy's relationship. This one mostly focuses on the importance of sex in relationships and how easily it can be used as a weapon against the opposite sex. It's not really a serious episode altogether (compared to the rest of the season, anyway), but it sends a nice message that most other adult sitcoms would never send.


100. Hank's Choice

Jon Vitti cranks out another weird one. I always loved that in the middle of all these straightforward episodes we would get one about rodeo clowns, dolphin rape, or a boy living in a doghouse, thanks to Jon Vitti. It's episodes like this that help make KOTH what it is. There isn't much to talk about here, as it's pretty simple, but I just had to point on the importance of these kinds of episodes.


101. It's Not Easy Being Green

It's nice seeing an episode focused on environmental issues where it's more than a simple black and white issue that can be solved by throwing a can in a separate bag. It's also nice to learn more about Boomhauer from the other guys. I always enjoy that kind of character development. It's also nice learning what happened to Boomhauer's "first love" back in the day.


102. The Trouble With Gribbles

Another funny, but sad episode. The Gribbles are put to the test by Nancy getting older and feeling it, and Dale taking advantage of both that and the cigarette company he has been buying from for years. This makes the episode hard to watch, especially if you feel for Nancy, as the couple is almost split apart by simple greed. It's a good thing this one is so funny, or it wouldn't work at all otherwise.


103. Hank's Back Story

I liken this to a far better version of "Hank's Unmentionable Problem". Here the issue is funnier, much less overblown like the constipation was, and leads to some really bizarre moments. Also the mower race at the end.


104. Kidney Boy & Hamster Girl: A Love Story

Mostly Bobby finally coming to terms with himself and his place in life, which was touched upon several times before this it is finally solidified as he stands up to teenagers twice his size to protect his friends and girlfriend. It's a touching end to the season, especially after all the crap that went on. It's nice seeing high school done such justice in an animated show, too. It's usually way over-exaggerated in TV shows, but it's done quite true here.


In conclusion, despite being darker than the seasons that had come before, it did help to add depth to the universe of KOTH and build on the characters. While some episodes border on hard to watch, it is mostly because of the plots and atmosphere this season put off which is different from others. The show never stays this dark again after this point, in fact the main criticism of the next season is that it's too cartoony! (We'll be the judge of that) But this season is another unqualified success for KOTH. Just try not to watch this season if you're feeling too down, otherwise you'll probably enjoy it just as much as the other seasons.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2014, 12:41:47 AM by Spark Of Spirit »
"The world will never starve for want of wonders, but for want of wonder." - G.K. Chesterton

Spark Of Spirit

  • Forward & Up!
  • Da Mod Squad
  • Head Of City Security
  • ********
  • Posts: 16182
  • Keep Moving
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #31 on: February 10, 2011, 03:06:45 PM »
Pigmalion is a season 5 holdover. Boy, does it show it. The only difference is that it manages to be way darker and cartoony than any episode in the season, almost like a satire of season 5.

I haven't rewatched it yet, but it will be interesting when I do.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2014, 12:48:13 AM by Spark Of Spirit »
"The world will never starve for want of wonders, but for want of wonder." - G.K. Chesterton

Daxdiv

  • Charlie Brown's Christmas Tree
  • *****
  • Posts: 1643
  • IN YOUR HEART!
    • Email
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #32 on: February 10, 2011, 05:15:11 PM »
Pigmalion, wasn't that the one where Luanne got a job from this guy that wasn't right in the head, and he made her dress up like this mascot girl on the box? That was a pretty dark episode from what I can recall. When I was first watching this, I was like "I am watching King of the Hill? Right?"

Spark Of Spirit

  • Forward & Up!
  • Da Mod Squad
  • Head Of City Security
  • ********
  • Posts: 16182
  • Keep Moving
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #33 on: February 10, 2011, 05:19:12 PM »
It's the one that ends with him getting a metal spike through his skull just as he regains his sanity, yes.

I honestly have no idea where that one came from.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2014, 12:48:57 AM by Spark Of Spirit »
"The world will never starve for want of wonders, but for want of wonder." - G.K. Chesterton

Avaitor

  • The Epic Trinity
  • Sacrificial Lamb
  • *********
  • Posts: 12700
    • Email
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #34 on: February 10, 2011, 05:26:16 PM »
That just feels so out of place with the show.

it's not a horrible episode or anything, but it feels like an episode from a whole other show.
Life is not about the second chances. It's about a little mouse and his voyage to an exciting new land. That, my friend, is what life is.

Sir, do you have any Warrants?
I got their first CD, but you can't have it, motherfucker!

New blog!
http://avaitorsblog.blogspot.com/

Spark Of Spirit

  • Forward & Up!
  • Da Mod Squad
  • Head Of City Security
  • ********
  • Posts: 16182
  • Keep Moving
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #35 on: February 10, 2011, 06:39:17 PM »
Yeah, like I said I really don't understand why it was made. Not that it's terrible or anything.

On another note, anyone who own season 6 on DVD remember this?



Sigh. I wish they would just bite the bullet and put a full series set or something out there. I would scrimp and save to get it, but I would get it.
"The world will never starve for want of wonders, but for want of wonder." - G.K. Chesterton

Avaitor

  • The Epic Trinity
  • Sacrificial Lamb
  • *********
  • Posts: 12700
    • Email
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #36 on: February 10, 2011, 06:43:02 PM »
When I pull out my season 6 DVD, I'm always saddened when I pull that out.

So close, yet so far away.
Life is not about the second chances. It's about a little mouse and his voyage to an exciting new land. That, my friend, is what life is.

Sir, do you have any Warrants?
I got their first CD, but you can't have it, motherfucker!

New blog!
http://avaitorsblog.blogspot.com/

Spark Of Spirit

  • Forward & Up!
  • Da Mod Squad
  • Head Of City Security
  • ********
  • Posts: 16182
  • Keep Moving
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #37 on: February 10, 2011, 08:40:00 PM »
On another note... I think season 8 is a better season than 7. I'll explain why when I get there, but it's really weird how out of place 8 is in between 7 and 9. It's still a good season, but 8 is better in pretty much every way.
"The world will never starve for want of wonders, but for want of wonder." - G.K. Chesterton

Spark Of Spirit

  • Forward & Up!
  • Da Mod Squad
  • Head Of City Security
  • ********
  • Posts: 16182
  • Keep Moving
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #38 on: February 14, 2011, 10:32:32 PM »
Season 6

A lot of people consider season 6 where the series lost the plot and became a generic FOX comedy show. While this season isn't anywhere near as in-depth as season 3 or 5, I have to agree that it can get a bit zany at times. But I think that helped it stand out at the time, and it lead to some of the outright funniest episodes of the entire show. Other than focusing on comedy on our developed cast, what else was there besides making it a soap opera? And we sure as hell didn't need that to happen to this show. That said, season 6 is another great KOTH season and here's why:


105. Bobby Goes Nuts

I still remembering watching this on premiere night with a bunch of people and laughing our asses off. And it still plays on multiple watches despite having perhaps the simplest idea of any KOTH episode. The writing team definitely showed no signs of fatigue here, and this episode was a perfect opener to the new "zanier" KOTH while still managing to keep it grounded, while season 7 would go a bit nutty, I think season 6 struck the perfect balance of classic KOTH style pacing with out of nowhere gags.


106. Soldier Of Misfortune

Following up with another of the best episodes of the series, and another one I remember enjoying tremendously in a group, this episode really delves into Dale's paranoia and insecurity while just managing to keep it realistically grounded. To be honest, I don't think this episode would have been nearly as great in any other season, and that makes it all the better. Again, more zany comedy built upon well developed characters, but the comedy is so well done and hilarious that it just doesn't matter if it isn't quite the same as the old style. It's still great.


107. Lupe's Revenge

Quite possibly the favorite episode of every Peggy-hater out there, and another hysterical ride. The problem with doing a summary of this season is that because it's more comedy based than emotional/character based, there's not as much to say about it without analyzing jokes, and I don't really want to ruin them that way. But this does show an interesting side of Peggy, (the cornered side) that we don't see too often.


108. The Father, The Son, And J.C.

After the onslaught of comedy based episodes, we get into this episode which explores Cotton and Hank's mutual "hatred" for each other. It's still funny, but in the more traditionally subdued way of early seasons and less on the gonzo gags. (Though the Jimmy Carter bit kind of is, it's still hysterical) Probably the best aspect is that no matter how much Cotton tears Hank down, he still wants him to love and respect him regardless, even if he knows he doesn't deserve it. The most he can admit to Hank is that he wouldn't incinerate him if given the chance. Touching.


109. Father Of The Bribe

An interesting relationship based episode between Connie and Bobby, where they attempt (and succeed) to manipulate the system and their parents to be together and discover that they don't really want to be together any more. It's a sweet mutual break up that's almost totally ruined by the next episode.


110. I'm With Cupid

If this episode wasn't really funny I'd probably hate it. It's out of character with both Bobby and Bill (Bill is over Lenore, his behaviour here doesn't make sense) and is pretty creepy in the end, but because the jokes are funny I can forgive it. It's still not one of the better season 6 episodes, though. Actually I'd probably consider it one of the series worst for being so annoyingly out of character for both Bill and Bobby here by ignoring two of the best series episodes and rehashing their plots here.


111. Torch Song Hillogy

Sort of a gimmicky episode based around the Olympic torch. The Bobby plot is nice and has a good ending, but this is kind of forgettable overall.


112. Joust Like A Woman

I have mixed feelings on this one. I mean, it's funny, but the whole thing doesn't really feel very KOTH at all. Not much to say on this one.


113. The Bluegrass Is Always Greener

A sweet episode that beings back the friendship aspect of Bobby and Connie that was almost erased, and one that shows us just how similar Hank and Kahn really are. The sub-plot here is very Dale and fits in just nice amidst the Bluegrass festival idea, and this was a nice step back to simpler ideas.


114. The Substitute Spanish Prisoner

Probably one of the more underrated episodes, Peggy gets sucked into a scam and no one can seem to get her out of it because the scammer is simply too smart... Except for Peggy herself. The best part is probably the entire plan Peggy had to trick him that was just a front for a better plan. Even I had to question Peggy's smarts when she came up with that one.


115. Unfortunate Son

Quite the interesting episode about how badly war veterans are treated (sometimes with each other, even) and how important it is to stick together in tight situations. This episode also features some great Hank and Cotton bonding where we learn Hank probably would have made a great soldier.


116. Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret Hill

Peggy really gets over her head here. Featuring perhaps one of the greatest Hank lines ("Now that's a clean burnin' Hell, I tell you what!"), and an interesting look at the idea of what faith means to some and to others and how different it can be, this is one of the more interesting episodes of season 6.


117. Tankin' It To The Streets

While still featuring the gonzo humor of season 6, this episode feels far more like it came from season 5. It's a bit of a downer as we learn exactly what might have happened to Bill for him to become the way he is now. But this does have an uplifting ending, so at least the experience wasn't all for naught in the end.


118. Of Mice And Little Green Men

A strange episode, but still a nice one focusing on the father and son relationship of Joseph and Dale and in the sub plot, Hank and Bobby. It is funny to see how much more each father and son have with the other instead of their own, but in the end we learn of how they really couldn't be any more similar to each other. A cute episode.


119. A Man Without A Country Club

A really funny episode where we finally get to see Chane Wassonasong's dad in greater detail.  This is mostly a Kahn episode disguised as a Hank one, but that doesn't stop it from being full of great Hank lines. Pinch me, Mr. Ho.


120. Beer And Loathing

The episode where we finally get to see Alamo Beer in depth from the inside and out, and what a horrible company they are. Thankfully despite Peggy's employment at the establishment, she eventually looks into her conscience and realizes just what a terrible place this is, and how it was even hurting the ones she loved. All in all, this is a great one.


121. Fun With Jane And Jane

Blond Jane! Old Jane! A good one that delves into how cults operate and prey on the lonely and emotionally weak and features a goofy sub plot that is just plain hysterical. The way the plots come together at the end is the perfect example of why there is no other show like KOTH out there. Oh yeah, and the final scene would only be perfected further if it was also Buck's final appearance.  ;)


122. My Own Private Rodeo

Meeting Dale's father and getting a handle on the character and why Dale is so paranoid all the time (Dale's father was hiding his sexual preference their entire marriage and hiding it from his family) and mistrusting of others. It also features gay jokes (typical of adult shows, I know) but they are at least in decent taste here. I think the only negative about this episode is that Cotton and Bug never meet. That would have led to an interesting moment or two, I'm sure.


123. Sug Night

This is a hard episode to put into words because a lot is going on here and it's hard to sum up. But for some reason, the naked cooking at the end feels like the perfect closer to this episode, even if I don't really know why. I probably need to re watch this again. It is really funny, though.


124. Dang Ol' Love

The episode that made me want more Boomhauer episodes. Even though he got the smaller focus of episodes under Hank, Bill, and Dale, the episodes he did get were always strong enough to make up for the lack of them. This episode is one reason why. Boomhauer is a bit of a kid throughout KOTH, curious about things and horny like a teenager, and here it is revealed to him just how much of one he is and it's up to Bill, of all people, to help him get back in the saddle.


125. Returning Japanese

Another fantastic two parter (and the last in the show, sadly enough), we get to learn more about Cotton's past as we go to Japan and learn that he has a son. The Ladybird and Bill and Dale plots add greatly to the comedy, but the main plot is very touching, even if it focuses on someone like Cotton.


126. Returning Japanese (Part II)

Junichiro proves himself to be quite the interesting character (despite sadly, again, never appearing beyond this episode even at Cotton's funeral), and we learn just how tight the bond between family can be. This episode marks the end of the era of KOTH with it's classic style pacing, IMO, after this the show feels a bit different in style and tone, not that that is a bad thing, but it feels different after this. However, I think if the show would have ended here, the ending would have been good enough.


All in all, season 6 is a great season. After this season 7 goes a bit further into wacky territory, sometimes treading too far into it, but the balance between wacky and emotional still remains here making it one of the best seasons of KOTH. It's not quite perfect, but it is definitely full of quality comedy and heart, putting it on par with the other great seasons. After this, KOTH feels different to me. The pacing, animation, music, and style of scripts changed (evolved?) which does make it feel like there was a deliberate choice to change it up. I'm not really sure why (and thanks to lack of DVD, will probably never know) the show seemed to sort of end in a way here, but I guess that just means we can consider this the halfway point of KOTH.

Find out how the new era stacks up when I tackle season 7 next!

« Last Edit: February 18, 2014, 12:57:44 AM by Spark Of Spirit »
"The world will never starve for want of wonders, but for want of wonder." - G.K. Chesterton

Dr. Ensatsu-ken

  • The Epic Trinity
  • Sacrificial Lamb
  • *********
  • Posts: 13408
  • "And all that'll be left is pure, white ash..."
    • Email
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #39 on: February 15, 2011, 04:51:42 PM »
I've been watching a few of Desensitized and Avaitor's recommendations. Once I finish all of them I'll try and give my individual thoughts on each episode, but for now I'll just say that I love how this show can successfully combine great humor with great dramatic elements. When you think about it, the show takes itself more seriously than most other animated sitcoms, and at times it can be a tad bit darker in tone with its subject matter, but it blends it in perfectly with some good comedy, and even if it doesn't always make me laugh out loud, each episode that I watch at least gets some positive reaction out of me, which is definitely a good thing.

Spark Of Spirit

  • Forward & Up!
  • Da Mod Squad
  • Head Of City Security
  • ********
  • Posts: 16182
  • Keep Moving
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #40 on: February 15, 2011, 09:24:44 PM »
Cool, I'm glad you're enjoying it. KOTH is one of those shows that just gets better the more you re-watch it. It's weird that way.
"The world will never starve for want of wonders, but for want of wonder." - G.K. Chesterton

Avaitor

  • The Epic Trinity
  • Sacrificial Lamb
  • *********
  • Posts: 12700
    • Email
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #41 on: February 15, 2011, 09:31:10 PM »
Yeah, it's really one of those shows you can find episodes that you've seen a couple of times before or thought you have and they'll become instant favorites like that.

The rewatch value on top of it's consistency is a big part of the show's quality and why Desen and I speak so highly of it IMO.

Also, the first four episodes of season 6 make for arguably the best side of any KOTH disc ever. Not a weak second from those episodes.
Life is not about the second chances. It's about a little mouse and his voyage to an exciting new land. That, my friend, is what life is.

Sir, do you have any Warrants?
I got their first CD, but you can't have it, motherfucker!

New blog!
http://avaitorsblog.blogspot.com/

Spark Of Spirit

  • Forward & Up!
  • Da Mod Squad
  • Head Of City Security
  • ********
  • Posts: 16182
  • Keep Moving
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #42 on: February 22, 2011, 08:32:43 PM »
I feel like moving on, so let's hit the next season.


Season 7

Season 7 was basically season 6 but wackier. In many ways it reminds me of season 9 of the Simpsons which itself is still very controversial in the fanbase by being a bit too wacky with not as many down to earth and emotional moments (even though they're still there), but still manages to be a good season in it's own right. IMO, other than the first season, I would consider this the weakest season I have looked at so far (assuming I skipped my old 9 and 10 looks... Because I'm not doing them again), but it still has more than enough memorable moments to pull it up.


127. Get Your Freak Off

The premiere for season 7... Doesn't really work well as a premiere, in my opinion. It's a good episode, but as far as "premiere" episodes go it's not as insane as Bobby Goes Nuts, as interesting as Death Of A Propane Salesman or The Decline & Fall, as "important" (message wise) as Perils Of Polling or as important to core characters as the pilot and How To Fire A Rifle. It's just a funny episode, but it doesn't stack up to previous premieres. That said, the boy band material is surprisingly funny and the sub plot of Peggy trying to make Hank look attractive is also a great character moment. All in all, this is another great episode, even if it isn't really a great 'premiere', and well worth watching.


128. The Fat & The Furious

This is a common staple of season 7, an absolutely bizarre plot with real surreal characters that while funny, is not really that memorable in retrospect. However, I do think this is the first episode where Dale's outright insulting treatment of Bill rears it's head so it is a bit more important than I give it credit for. Still, this is the first episode where I realized something seemed odd about the direction of the show.


129. Bad Girls, Bad Girls, Whatcha Gonna Do

A Bobby and Connie focused episode that instead uses a new character as an obstacle between them. Tid Pau acts as a great foil to both Bobby and Connie and probably would have been a great character to keep around had this episode not ended the way it did, but unfortunately it ends sending her away. My only issue is that the end of the episode is a bit TOO extreme for KOTH, both in how insane the premise for it is and the resolution. The sub plot of Hank and the gang trying to clean up Tid Pau's graffiti works surprisingly well, too. One interesting tidbit, is the guy from the restaurant from Love Hurts is running a sushi joint now. Weird.


130. Goodbye Normal Jeans

Bobby can cook and clean (remember this for future episodes) and basically outdo Peggy in housework! And Peggy can't take it! A lot like Lupe's Revenge, we see Peggy at wit's end, but this time because of her own son! A nice episode, but one I'm sure Peggy haters love since it basically shows Peggy as the mediocre housewife and petty person she is. But the other half of the plot, Bobby and Hank interacting on such a friendly level is quite fun. On the other side, the sub plot with Dale is kind of annoying and Peggy kind of goes a bit too over the deep end at the end. But the end of the episode featuring Hank expressing why he really needs Peggy is fantastic. Great episode.


131. Dance With Dogs

Now this is an example where even if the idea is absolutely insane, as long as it's funny and memorable, it will succeed in being a great episode. This is a great episode despite being so insane in idea and execution. The episode plays well on Bill's insecurity and loneliness as well as the odd competitive nature Bobby and Hank can display towards each other. It's also always nice to see Ladybird, as she is the outlet of most of Hank's emotions, so the contrast between his arguments with Bobby while standing behind Ladybird are quite funny. An episode that could only work in this season, it's kind of a shame that there aren't more of them like this one.


132. The Son Also Roses

Another episode carried by jokes, and funny ones. The plot seems a little forced in order to push Hank into a "girly" area with Bobby, but since it ends up being funny enough it works. Plus, we need more of this dude.


133. The Texas Skilsaw Massacre

Easily one of the best episodes of the series, this episode plays on Hank's anger and brings him to it's absolute boiling in this episode in an outlandish way that only season 7 could do. This is where Hank's anger finally reaches it's plateau leading to both extremely funny jokes and good insights into his character when a friend that he met on equal terms in an anger management class dies from his anger which finally seems to affect Hank. The episode ends with him losing his temper against his friends in order to save their lives, but I think this episode ended up changing Hank as a character. His temper after this episode never really became an issue again as the revelation in this episode proved to Hank that anger is not an emotion that should be swung around like a sword or you might end up cutting yourself. If anything, it seemed to make Hank a much more receptive person. Fantastic episode all around.


134. Full Metal Dust Jacket

An interesting episode focusing on books and their importance while at the same time showing just how overrated they can get by others on the Peggy side of the plot. It's kind of general, but it's fun. Bobby's plot is a bit dull and predictable, unfortunately. The Dale side of the plot is a bit silly to me. This episode is a bit average overall.


135. Pigmalion

So here we are at Pigmalion. An episode made in season 5 finally aired in season 7. Boy, does it show. With all the dark moments of season 5 and the insane humor of season 7... this is quite the messed up episode. But... it feels almost like someone wrote a screenplay for a horror movie and accidentally turned it in as a KOTH script, because it isn't very KOTH like at all. Mostly focusing on a character we had never met before through the eyes of Luanne as he slowly descends into madness and ends up chasing down Luanne and eventually getting electroshocked and impaled at episode's end... Yeah, this is not one for re-watching. That said, it's not really a bad episode. It's just not really a KOTH episode.


136. Megalo Dale

One of the funniest episodes of the series where Dale's paranoia actually ends up saving the day (with Chuck Mangione, of course) from an infestation at the Megalo Mart. While it's not really a very deep episode, it instead succeeds because of it's hysterical nature and reliance of characters we already know a lot about which is what KOTH was beginning to rely more on as they were now able to after 7 seasons on the air. Add that familiarity with season 7's insane style and you have a real winner.


137. Boxing Luanne

An episode where Luanne finally stands up for herself in more ways than one to prove she is more than an attractive woman by beating the crap out of people. Or so she thinks. A surprisingly lower key episode than most of the season (other than the actual premise and fighting, anyway), but a totally welcome one.


138. Vision Quest

John Redcorn's awkward Joseph relationship continues. This time because of Dale's misguided attempts to "guide" his son through things he shouldn't. A surprisingly funny episode despite the material of "going astray" (which is taken quite seriously) as the main plot point. Thankfully we learn that Dale's idiocy isn't the only thing guiding Joseph as both John Redcorn's dire warnings and Bobby's easygoing nature are enough to steer him right. Speaking of Bobby, that ending is weird.


139. Queasy Rider

Other than the great Peggy and Hank dynamic, this is just another weird episode in the KOTH canon. Good, but not great.


140. Board Games

Finally an episode more on the Peggy, Minh, and Nancy relationship, and how they all can both work together and against each other. This is a fun episode, and another surprisingly low key episode in the season of such insanity.


141. An Officer & A Gentle Boy

The Bobby/Cotton dynamic is explored a bit more here, as we find out more about Cotton's youth in an old military academy where Bobby is sent after screwing up a few too many times. Cotton takes the place over and steamrolls the students pushing Bobby to his ultimate limit where we learn just how strong Bobby really is and how highly he thinks of Cotton. This is a great episode in exploring the relationship between three generations of Hill men, and has some great comedy throughout. This is easily one of the best episodes of season 7.


142. The Miseducation Of Bobby Hill

Putting aside the great A-Plot (because there's nothing I can really add to it, it's just a great idea), the B-Plot is the issue I was having with KOTH at the time. While mostly prevalent in the first quarter of the season before being thankfully toned down, the B-plot is way too outlandish for this show. For instance, the A-plot shows us Hank's complex take on the propane business as well as informing his son on the right thing to do which alone would make a great episode. The B-plot focuses on Bill in a flying chair getting lost in Mexico and being beaten like a pinata. Again, it's funny, but it feels like something you would see on the Simpsons or something. But all in all, this is a good episode.


143. The Good Buck

A nice Buck Strickland episode where he is finally out-sleazed and for the first time is almost able to see just how bad a person he is, ironically what his original purpose as a born-again Christian was meant to entail. This is also funny in seeing just how many sleazy guys live around Arlen and hang near the main characters. The B-plot is entirely forgettable, however.


144. I Never Promised You An Organic Garden

I think of this as a KOTH version of a movie like the Mighty Ducks. The losers and slackers of the school come together to do something for the ones who looked down upon them, and find their own niche in the society of school. It's a neat little episode. It's too bad that once again, Peggy almost messes it all up. Still, it's nice to have a quaint episode like this once in a while.


145. Be True To Your Fool

Bizarre. I have nothing to really add to this. It's just weird.


146. Racist Dawg

Quite possibly the worst episode in the entire series, this is a hard episode to watch. Featuring all the worst aspects of KOTH thrown to the forefront, such as character beat-downs, obnoxious behavior, the lack of community involvement over things they should be based on their characters, and the dumbest premise for an episode by far up to this point. I don't want to have to linger on the things wrong with this episode, so I'll just move on. Suffice to say, this is the first real blemish in KOTH's run.


147. Night & Deity

An interesting "switch" of an episode where Dale finds himself attracted to a sexy exterminator and Nancy gets jealous. The Nancy and Dale relationship was always sweet, so it's always nice having an episode focused on it.


148. Maid In Arlen

Probably the best episode in the season on an emotional level (and the only real emotional one, unfortunately), we meet Kahn's mother Laoma who is a great character that fits right in with the other characters on Rainey Street, especially Bill. The episode bases it's entire humor on one person disrupting the natural flow of the neighbourhood in a natural way that's purely positive. Honestly, this should have been either the premiere or finale of the season as it just stands out so much amidst the chaos of season 7. Those looking for a more down to earth experience from this season definitely need to see this one. It is the most character development this season has in both Bill and Kahn, but unfortunately it doesn't last beyond this episode. Still, this is a great one.


149. Witches Of East Arlen

A real letdown of a finale. This is an average episode of KOTH all around, and should not have been the finale over the far superior Maid In Arlen which is one the series' best episodes. They should have just held this over to season 8 or aired it earlier, because it doesn't stand out at all. Disappointing end to such a good season.




Despite my overall positive impressions, season 7 is probably the first season where the show felt like it had some cracks in it. There are a lot of great episodes in here (and classics) but also a lot of outright filler with recycled ideas and the crazy humor starting to cross the line of being too zany and obnoxious. Don't get me wrong, it's still well worth watching for the many great moments, but it was the first season that felt "patched together" without a clear goal or ongoing idea. The finale being so incredibly weak and the premiere being a standard episode highlight these problems too well. There's also the total lack of any foreshadowing, character growth, ongoing plots, or new characters that aren't guest characters.

Season 7 also has the first episode I would consider outright bad in it with few redeeming qualities in it, as well as the first where the show felt more like a "TV show" than a universe like all the true classic TV shows do. Thankfully, they address this problem with the premiere of the very next season, but it doesn't mean season 7 doesn't feel a little disappointing as a whole in retrospect.

Next I'll be doing season 8, then a bit of a summary before hopping over to season 11. My season 8 impression might take a little longer than this one did, however.
"The world will never starve for want of wonders, but for want of wonder." - G.K. Chesterton

Avaitor

  • The Epic Trinity
  • Sacrificial Lamb
  • *********
  • Posts: 12700
    • Email
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #43 on: February 22, 2011, 09:11:25 PM »
Season 7 wasn't bad per say, but it was where cracks were beginning to show. I think this is where Mike and Greg were starting to clash in terms of whose influence would take over the show, and it would get progressively more conflicting as it got along. I think by season 11 there was a better balance of the show's humor and heart that was missing a little in this part of the series.
Life is not about the second chances. It's about a little mouse and his voyage to an exciting new land. That, my friend, is what life is.

Sir, do you have any Warrants?
I got their first CD, but you can't have it, motherfucker!

New blog!
http://avaitorsblog.blogspot.com/

Spark Of Spirit

  • Forward & Up!
  • Da Mod Squad
  • Head Of City Security
  • ********
  • Posts: 16182
  • Keep Moving
Re: King of the Hill
« Reply #44 on: February 22, 2011, 09:25:56 PM »
Yeah, it feels like that a lot.

The weird part is that season 8 is basically what season 7 should have been. It's a weird rise in quality across the board that dips back down in season 9 (and 10 since it's a holdover season from 9)... I really wish I knew what was going on here, but from season 7-10 it feels like someone was fighting with someone to push the show in a certain direction, then everyone gave up.

I don't think Mike or Greg had much to do with those seasons, since I think they said they were burnt out by season 6.

Oh, I found this on Wiki:

Quote
Judge and Daniels' lessening involvement with the show resulted in the series' format changing to become more episodic and formulaic.[4] Beginning in Season 7, the series was taken over by John Altschuler and Dave Krinsky, who had worked on the series since the second season, and who tended to emphasize Judge's concept of the series as being built around socio-political humor rather than character-driven humor.[4] Although FOX insisted that the series lack character development or story-arcs (a demand made of the network's other animated series, so that they can be shown out of order in syndication)[4], Judge and Daniels had managed to develop several minor arcs and story elements throughout the early years of the series, such as Luanne's becoming more independent and educated following Buckley's death, and the aging of characters being acknowledged (a rare narrative occurrence for an animated series).[4] Lacking Judge and Daniels' supervision, the series ceased aging its characters and even began retconning character backstories; in the episode A Rover Runs Through It, Peggy's mother was abruptly changed from a neurotic housewife with whom Peggy shared a competitive relationship, to a bitter rancher from whom Peggy had been estranged for several years.
Now, it says Altschuler and Krinsky did this... But they were pretty much ones responsible for season 11's upswing in quality and return to the classic style of KOTH humor from the early seasons, so I'm thinking this means FOX wanted the show to be a gag fest and less like KOTH so Mike and Greg wanted none of it.
"The world will never starve for want of wonders, but for want of wonder." - G.K. Chesterton